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Volume 14 Issue 3

The full table of contents is available here.

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Beyond Tolerance in Psychoanalytic Communities: Reflexive Skepticism and Critical Pluralism; Lewis Aron: The Fluidity of Emotions and Clinical Vulnerability: A Field of Rhythmic Tensions; Steven H. Knoblauch: The Relational Approach and its Critics: A Conference with Dr. Jon Mills: Introduction to The Relational Approach and its Critics: A Conference with Dr. Jon Mills; Aner Govrin: Challenging Relational Psychoanalysis: A Critique of Postmodernism and Analyst Self-Disclosure; Jon Mills: Straw Men, Stereotypes, and Constructive Dialogue: A Response to Mill’s Criticism of the Relational Approach; Chana Ullman: On Multiple Epistemologies in Theory and Practice: A Response to Jon Mills’ “Challenging Relational Psychoanalysis: A Critique of Postmodernism and Analyst Self-Disclosure”; Shlomit Yadlin-Gadot: Relational Psychoanalysis and the Concepts of Truth and Meaning: Response to Jon Mills; Boaz Shalgi: Projective Identification and Relatedness: A Kleinian Perspective; Merav Roth: Psychoanalysis and Postmodernism: A Response to Dr. Jon Mills’ “Challenging Relational Psychoanalysis: A Critique of Postmodernism and Analyst Self-Disclosure”; Liran Razinsky: Relational Psychoanalysis Out of Context: Response to Jon Mills; Steven Kuchuck and Rachel Sopher

Lewis Aron, PhD argues for approaching contemporary psychoanalytic multiplicity with an attitude of “reflexive skepticism” and “critical pluralism.” In this view, the criticism of the other can become a unique gift, mutually exchanged among schools. With this paper the author Steven H. Knoblauch, PhD offers a renovation of field theory in psychoanalysis as a way to recognize and work with a significantly more difficult to narrate region of experience that can shape an interactive field. Aner Govrin, PhD and Dr. Jon Mills, PhD asked two relational psychoanalysts, together with an independent school psychologist, a Kleinian psychoanalyst, and a researcher of hermeneutics and culture, to respond to Mills’ address, each from his or her unique vantage point. Jon Mills’, PsyD, PhD, ABPP paper is based on two lectures given at Bar-Illan University, Israel, on February 13, 2015. These lectures were largely derived from Mills’ book Conundrums: A Crtitique of Contemporary Psychoanalysis (Mills, 2012). In this discussion of Mills’ presentation, Chana Ullman, PhD first takes issue with his divisive discourse. She then presents an alternative view of postmodern influences on relational psychoanalysis and Mills’ criticism of self-disclosure. Shlomit Yadlin-Gadot, PhD writes that Mill’ critique of relational psychoanalysis is pivotal in reintroducing issues of truth into psychoanalytic theory but does not allow us the full benefit of the many insightful criticisms of traditional psychoanalytic claims. In this response, Boaz Shalgi PhD looks at Professor Mills’ paper through the concepts of truth and meaning. It argues that the meaning of every experience is created. Merav Roth, PhD offers a Kleinian view of the relational understandings described in Mills’ paper regarding two central issues: the exploration of the analyst’s subjectivity by the patient, and the use of self-disclosure. Liran Razinsky’s, PhD paper offers a critique of Mills’ critique. Razinsky starts with noting that Mills supplies only vague, imprecise, and overgeneralized paraphrases of postmodern notions and argues that psychoanalysis should renew its links with the humanities and seek dialogue with them. Authors Steven Kuchuck, LCSW and Rachel Sopher, LCSW close the panel by mapping out and responding to Jon Mills’ critique of relational psychoanalysis and provide a historical background within which to contextualize the framework for the debate.

 

Book Review: Psychoanalytic Knowledge: Its Survival and Evolution

Aner Govrin offers a variety of perspectives on the notions of fascination and disenchantment in the context of psychoanalysis.

 

Creative Literary Arts: Life’s Undersong: Poems in 6 Voices

In this issue, we have a remarkable mix of themes and variations - the inner voices of five psychoanalysts and a grandmother - all grappling with the mystery of unknown places.

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